Publications

Linked below are selected publications by Dr. John Kasarda addressing the basics of airport city and aerotropolis planning and development as well as articles on his work and that of Aerotropolis Business Concepts LLC. A more comprehensive set of publications can be found at www.aerotropolis.com.


Are Airports Non-Places?

Summer 2011
Airport Consulting

Social scientists view airports as quintessential "non-places". "Places" communicate identity, social meaning, and history while "non-places", lacking these attributes, are held to be anonymous, disorienting and off-putting.

Welcome to the Age of Aerotropolis

Spring, 2011
Appears in Endeavors

Cities flourished as seaports. Towns sprouted around rivers. Railroads opened the hinterlands, and highways connected suburbs. Now, the fastest-growing cities in the world are airport cities. Beijing and Dubai and Brisbane have already started listening to a UNC business professor named Jack Kasarda, who says that our nation's future is up in the air.

The Change in Reign: As Hong Kong International Becomes the World’s Top Air Cargo Airport, Challenges Lie Ahead

Spring, 2011

The crown has been passed from Memphis to Hong Kong. Memphis, which had been the leading cargo airport every year since 1992, handled 3.9 million metric tons of cargo in 2010. Hong Kong processed 4.1 million metric tons last year – an increase of 23 percent over the previous year.

Big plans for Panama: Panama’s Airport City and Aerotropolis Ambitions

June-July, 2011
Appears in Airport World

Central America has lagged behind other regions of the world in airport city and aerotropolis development. This is about to change.

Creating an Aerotropolis: How Indianapolis Is Strategically Charting Its Airport’s and Region’s Future

Spring, 2011

Indianapolis International Airport (IND), handling a total of 7.5 million passengers and 1.05 million metric tons of cargo in 2010, received much more than a facelift in 2008. A new state-of-the-art airport was opened adjacent to the old one on a greenfield site a mile wide and over two miles in length.

India’s Aviation Sector: Dynamic Transformation

2009
Indian Economic Superpower: Fiction or Future?

This book chapter examines the rise of India's modern civil aviation sector and the opportunities and challenges its airlines and airports have faced. A number of specific cases are provided.

Governing the aerotropolis

Spring, 2009

Aviation-linked commercial development, once confined largely to airport property and its immediate environs, is rapidly spreading outward. In the process, a new airport-anchored urban economic region is forming — the aerotropolis. The aerotropolis encompasses the airport city and the air commerce driven areas surrounding it.

Achieving good airport-neighbor relations

Fall, 2009

At the heart of every aerotropolis is a successful airport. Busy commercial airports are increasingly recognised as producers of local and regional benefit. They have become ever more important economic engines as business travel and air cargo expands, benefiting aviation-dependent firms not only in the immediate airport area but often those considerable distances away.

Aerotropolis is key to global competition

December, 2009
Appears online at http://business.in.com

John D Kasarda has researched this development around the world, he has seen how airports are evolving from transportation and supply chain-focused areas into mixed-use commercial centers * press the next arrow at the end of p.1 for continuation of article

Airport Cities & the Aerotropolis: New Planning Models

April, 2007
Appears in Airport Innovation

Airports have traditionally been viewed as places where aircraft operate and passengers and cargo transit. This traditional understanding is giving way to a broader, more encompassing model which recognizes the fact that along with their core aeronautical infrastructure and services, virtually all major airports have incorporated a wide variety of non-aeronautical facilities and services.

"International airline routes are the quintessential manifestation of 21st century globalization. They are our high-speed physical Internet, moving people and products quickly and efficiently over long distances. Airports are its routers, attracting time-critical, globally-oriented businesses of all types to their environs creating a new urban form – the Aerotropolis."

Time Magazine, 2011

Aerotropolis The Way We'll Live Next

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"The aerotropolis is the physical incarnation of globalization made concrete in urban form reflecting local interfaces of worldwide airborne flows of people and products."

John D. Kasarda

"In today's globally-networked, turbulent economy it is no longer the big eating the small but the fast eating the slow. Economies of speed have become as important as economies of scale and economies of scope for firms and cities to compete."

John D. Kasarda

"A well-designed aerotropolis functions as an 'urban pipe' reducing time-cost frictions of space and distance, thereby increasing both firm and regional operational efficiency."

John D. Kasarda

"The primary metrics for aerotropolis planning are not space and distance but time and cost of connecting. It is not how far but how fast firms and business people can connect to their suppliers, customers, and enterprise partners locally, nationally and globally."

John D. Kasarda

"Cities used to be almost exclusively destinations and airports solely places of departure. Now airports are becoming destinations and cities places of departure as their residents and workers increasingly travel to emerging airport cities and aerotropolises around the world."

John D. Kasarda

"A globally competitive aerotropolis will not likely evolve on a spontaneous, ad hoc basis. Rather, it must be guided by a shared vision, strategy, and coordinated actions among the private, public, and institutional sectors."

John D. Kasarda

"In the Aerotropolis model, transportation and logistics are not costs to be minimized, but value-adding services to be optimized."

John D. Kasarda

"Airports today are not just trade facilitators; they are trade creators by quickly connecting businesspeople and high-value, time-critical products to distant customers and markets."

John D. Kasarda

"Under Global City 4.0, exports of knowledge-based, information-intensive business services – delivered to distant sites by air traveling auditors, consultants, corporate lawyers, investment bankers, marketers, and professionals of all types – will far eclipse the value of the Global City’s goods exports."

John D. Kasarda

"As our world becomes increasingly networked, ever-greater amounts of commerce will flow to and through its hubs, especially its major air hubs and the metropolitan regions they serve, creating a global hierarchy of aerotropolises established by the strength of air hub connectivity and resulting value of goods and services trade generated."

John D. Kasarda